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There is much still to be learned about if, how, and when blended learning is effectively implemented in K-12 settings. Implementing evidence-based practices requires multiple stakeholders to take coordinated action utilizing a breadth of knowledge and skills traditionally associated with very different roles and responsibilities. Doing what’s best for students requires typical good research and measurement practice to be applied in this sector. 

Because of the rapidly innovative nature of blended learning, researchers need to take a particularly applied view of generating evidence, and implementers need to be particularly proactive about asking the questions they need answered in order to do their jobs. Both groups also need to ensure that their expectations for evidence match the maturity of implementation and the length of time required to find some answers. (View our Powerpoint about the challenges of measuring blended learning.)

Blended Learning Measurement Agenda 

The Learning Accelerator has developed a “measurement agenda,” which outlines the skills, knowledge, and activities necessary for stakeholders to build our evidence base and advance our collective understanding of blended learning’s effectiveness. The strategies contained in this agenda are primarily focused on the teaching and learning happening at the classroom or school level, and the four parts fit together like puzzle pieces to complete the picture of evidence.

Measurement Learning Agenda

The measurement learning agenda outlines strategies that enable us to generate evidence for decision-making and implementation, and include data and questions from practice in the generation of new evidence.

Some of the conditions that enable the Measurement Learning Agenda to be achieved, include:

  • educators using data to make instructional decisions, and contributing data to generate evidence; along with

  • researchers taking an applied view of research, and using a research-to-practice framework for understanding what is and isn’t working for teaching and learning in classrooms.

Support and demand for the generation of evidence from other stakeholders like funders, decision-makers, and members of the community and industry is also crucial for enabling different research designs, measures, and methods to be used to move beyond exploratory and descriptive studies as much as possible, ensuring an increase in the level of confidence we have in findings (internal validity); answering more sophisticated questions about cause and effect (rigor); and generating findings that are applicable to broader classrooms and contexts (external validity).

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